New Shot Could Relieve Migraines for Up to Three Months

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iStock

Migraines are the third most common illness in the word, but their underlying causes and how to treat them are still largely a mystery to doctors. Now, NPR reports that an alternative therapy may be on the way for migraine sufferers dissatisfied with pills that only mask the symptoms. A new type of shot has the potential to relieve migraines for up to three months while causing hardly any side effects.

Since the 1980s, scientists have studied how a protein called calcitonin gene–related peptide (CGRP) relates to migraine episodes. Research shows that people experiencing the throbbing head pain, vertigo, and light sensitivity that come with migraines have high levels of this protein in their blood.

When CGRP is injected into the bloodstream of someone who's susceptible to migraines, it triggers these intense symptoms, researchers found. But when people who don't normally get migraines receive a shot of it, their side effects are mild pain at worst. Further studies in mice demonstrated that by blocking CGRP in the brain, researchers could stop their migraine-like symptoms from developing.

The first CGRP-blocking treatment for humans came in the form of a pill in 2011. Though the clinical trials seemed promising, the medication never made it into pharmacies due to its possible effects on the liver. The latest version of the therapy doesn't interact with the liver at all. Instead, monoclonal antibodies, the same immune molecules often used in cancer treatments, are injected directly into the blood. They bypass the organ to block CGRP in the brain.

Four pharmaceutical companies have developed CGRP-blocking medicine for migraines, and based on their clinical trials, the shots relieve pain for periods ranging from one to two days to three months at a time. And unlike current treatments on the market, which include antidepressants and epilepsy medication as well as prescription pain relievers, the most noticeable side effect is pain at the injection site.

Two of the companies developing the drug, Amgen (in collaboration with Novartis) and Teva Pharmaceuticals, will know in June whether the drug has been approved by the FDA, while Eli Lilly and Alder Biopharmaceuticals plan to submit their medications for approval later in 2018. If they are made available to the public, the treatments will likely be pricey, falling in the range of $8000 to $18,000 a year for patients who get the shots once a month. And though there are hardly any side effects in the short term, the drugs haven't been studied enough for long-term side effects to emerge. For those reasons, the shots may work best as a last resort for migraine sufferers for whom all other treatments have failed.

[h/t NPR]

Allergies Are On the Rise, and Scientists Have a Good Idea Why

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iStock

If it seems like everyone around you is constantly sneezing and sniffling, it might be because allergies are on the rise. As New Scientist reports, several studies seem to indicate this is an ongoing trend. While allergies were rare before the mid-20th century, they’re now a common occurrence in children and adults alike. According to the Food Allergy Research and Education Organization, 15 million people in the U.S. have a food allergy.

To make matters worse, some of the fastest-developing countries are seeing a steady increase in allergies, especially in China. Asthma rates among children in Shanghai rose from 2 percent to 10 percent between 1990 and 2011.

So what exactly is at play here? Scientists think the rise in allergies has much to do with how drastically our lifestyles have changed in the last century. In particular, many modern people spend most of their days—and lives—indoors, which wasn’t always the norm. Spending time outdoors at an early age helps expose you to certain microbes “that have helped hone the human immune system for millennia,” New Scientist notes.

For that reason, children who grow up on farms are less likely to develop allergies. However, scientists still don’t understand exactly how these microbes help prevent our immune system from producing Immunoglobulin E, which is released in response to an allergen coming into contact with the body.

Fortunately, there are ways to keep your allergies under control, even if you can't prevent them entirely. Showering before you sleep, using an air purifier, and keeping pets off your bed are just a few of the quick tips you can try.

[h/t New Scientist]

Dr. Pimple Popper's New Game Lets You Get In on the Popping Action

Dr. Pimple Popper created a game, and it’s as gross as you’d expect—or as satisfying, if you’re into that kind of thing. The game, aptly called Pimple Pete, is a little like Operation—except you’ll be pulling out pus instead of extracting funny bones and spare ribs.

Dermatologist Dr. Sandra Lee has built an empire on people’s obsession with the icky but oddly pleasing art of pimple popping. She told Mental Floss in 2017 that many people find it relaxing, and that it gives them “a sense of completeness.” Others, of course, can't stand to watch two seconds of a cyst-popping video.

After the success of her YouTube channel (where she still posts almost daily), Lee launched her own skincare line and filmed a TV show that is currently airing on TLC. For her latest venture, she teamed up with entertainment company Spin Master to create a nerve-racking, "explosive" game in which two or more players are tasked with pulling out rubbery pimples, one at a time. However, the unlucky player who accidentally bursts the red “Mega-Zit” on Pete’s nose gets sprayed with pus—well, water—and receives no points for that round.

Here’s what that looks like:

Some pimples are easier to pull out than others, and the more challenging ones carry a higher point value. You can order Pimple Pete on Amazon.

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